Cheaters In College Football Should Not Be Allowed To Reap The Rewards

Posted: June 6, 2011 in News, Sports
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Last years BCs Championship game was #1 vs. #2 but they weren’t just the highest ranked teams for their performance they were also #1 Auburn and #2 Oregon for major violation in NCAA that year.  Does this mean College football has lost its conscience !

“Doesn’t get more “top of the sport” than No. 1 vs. No. 2. The BCS championship game essentially symbolized the season it capped, pitting Auburn — whose Heisman-winning quarterback, Cam Newton, claimed not to know that his father, Cecil, asked Mississippi State for $180,000 for his signature on a letter of intent — against Oregon –which paid $25,000 to a recruiting “consultant” who allegedly had been shopping high-profile recruits among top programs.”

Other Excerpts of cheating from last year:

Reggie Bush returned the Heisman Trophy he won in 2005 after evidence was corroborated that USC boosters were providing his family with cash and even a house.

• A North Carolina assistant resigned and seven Tar Heels players were suspended after admitting illegal contact with an agent. Players at Georgia, Alabama and South Carolina were also suspended for similar violations, usually involving selling tickets or memorabilia or accepting gifts.

• Four former Auburn players revealed during an investigation by cable network HBO that they were provided with several thousand dollars in cash while playing for the Tigers.

• A Sports Illustrated investigation found 56 players with criminal records for violent crimes on the rosters of preseason Top 25 teams, and few schools interested in doing background checks.

• Fiesta Bowl executive director John Junker resigned after directing bowl employees to donate to political candidates and reimbursing them for the donations, a violation of federal campaign law. Junker is now under federal investigation.

• And then there’s Ohio State, where, last December, five players were suspended for five games of the 2011 season — yet were somehow declared eligible for the Sugar Bowl — after federal agents investigating a drug ring discovered they had been selling Buckeyes memorabilia in exchange for tattoos, a breach of NCAA rules. Tressel was warned about the violation via e-mail, but rather than reporting it as he was required to, he denied any knowledge to the school and NCAA investigators. His resignation Monday was the result.

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